Image
作者

2015 IPP International Conference: New Humanism, Governance and Sustainable Development Agenda

11. 07, 2017  |     |  0 comments



IPP 2015 International Conference:

New Humanism, Governance and Sustainable Development

Organized by Institute of Public Policy (IPP),

South China University of Technology (SCUT) in cooperation with UNESCO

Date:22-23 August, 2015

Venue:Guangzhou· China


Conference Co-chairs:

Prof Yongnian Zheng (Chairman of the Academic Committee, IPP, SCUT; Director, East Asian Institute, National University of Singapore)

Dr Hans d’Orville (Special Advisor to the Director-General of UNESCO; Honorary Professor, IPP, SCUT)


1. Current Development Models and Their Drawbacks

The past 70 years of global development has created tremendous material wealth, but the hefty cost of this type of development is also far beyond any anticipation. For one, in 2008, the global financial crisis was a turning point that necessitated a new round of reflection on development models. And then the growing consciousness about the need for sustainable development, given the environmental or ecological destruction as a result of growth-only strategic orientations added another dimension to the discussions.

The flaws in present models have also been transferred to developing countries and causing problems of their own, like those inherent in the “middle income trap”. Others still are mired in political instability or even turmoil, social unrest and inequality or, most recently in health crises which pose serious constraints on their economic development.

As the world’s largest developing country, China has been highly regarded as a successful model for its 30-year rapid economic development. However, China’s economic achievement has come at the cost of a significant ecological and environmental deterioration, climate change, exploitation of natural resources, threats to cultural diversity, growing social inequality, and so on. The sustainability of China’s development model requires reflection as well, especially as thirty years of 10+ per cent economic growth seems now to be replaced by a new normal of 7+ per cent.


2. The Ascending Role of Sustainable Development and New Humanism

The concepts of sustainability and sustainable development – with the economic, social and environmental dimensions as three pillars - and of a new humanism have entered the international debate as now orientations for developmental policies. This vision is to define a universal compass to which the realities of our times must be tailored to. Sustainability is often seen as an ecological issue, but it is no less an issue of our moral economy. Sustainable development is inseparable from equality, and equality in the twenty-first century is above all equality between men and women. Sustainability means also quality education, which transforms lives and is the main catalyst for human development, allowing people to adapt to change and reinvent themselves. It is the sturdiest foundation of society. Sustainability is also found in culture promoting inclusion and giving confidence, allowing to draw energy from history to build a lasting future. Culture is the source of resilience. Sustainability means building the capacities of societies through science, research and the sharing of knowledge, enabling innovation, invention, better anticipation of risks and preparation for the hazards of an uncertain world.

Sustainable development with its three pillars, as highlighted by the Rio+20 UN Conference in June 2012 and the subsequent efforts to design a set of Sustainable Development Goals for the post-2015 development agenda, complementing the Millennium Development Goals, is now the central focus of negotiations among governments and the international community at large. For its part, UNESCO has advanced the concept of New Humanism, which puts human beings, especially women and youth, at the core of development, representing another significant revision to past trends over-emphasizing economic development. By doing so, it is broadening substantially the focus of development beyond mere economic determinism.

The vision set out for a New Humanism is one that seeks to help people create their own future. It is not, as was the mostly the case in the former versions of humanism, a mere culture for the elites. It is a resource for all individuals and all communities to pursue their own progress and development. This presupposes social inclusion of everyone and at all levels of society. At the global level, it translates into forms of cooperation that promote the transformative power of education, the sciences, culture and communication. Every human being must have access to a quality education as well as to the benefits of science and the capacity to participate in the social and cultural life of his or her community, either at the local or at the global level.

While classical humanism sought to reconcile tradition with modernity, as well as the rights of individual with their duties as members of communities, the New Humanism will have to help reconcile the local with the global, and people with nature. In essence, humanism rests on two pillars. The first pillar is the search for the full realization of the individual. It is the emancipation of the human person, his rights and capabilities. The second pillar is the feeling of belonging to a single human community, beyond our differences of origin, race, and religion. We have a globalized economy, we have experienced global wars, but we still fail to produce an authentic human civilization. A New Humanism will succeed if governments, civil society and the private sector manage to identify principles of solidarity that meet the requirements of our era.


3. Conference Themes

The IPP 2015 International Conference will focus on the theme of New Humanism, Governance and Sustainable Development. Global experts and scholars from prominent universities and research institutes, government officials in relevant fields, leaders from the UN system and non-governmental organizations will gather at the conference to discuss relations between sustainable development, governance and issues concerning New Humanism, and explore new practical development models for the world, especially the developing countries. Topics in the lineup include:


1.        Reflection on current development models

2.        Institutional perspectives: the role of multilateral, regional and national institutions for sustainable development

3.        Education and sustainable development

4.        Gender equality, new Humanism and sustainable development

5.        Science, technology and innovation for sustainable development and the impact of new tools of communication and information

6.        Culture and development diversity



Tentative Conference Programme

Day 1


8:30-9:00   Registration


9:00-9:20   Welcome remarks

University Head, South China University of Technology


9:20-10:20 Keynote Speech: Sustainable Development and New Humanism

Dr Hans d’Orville, Special Advisor to the Director-General of UNESCO;

Honorary Professor& Member of the International Advisory Board, IPP, South China University of Technology


10:20-10:50      Tea Break


10:50-12:20 Panel 1: Reflection on Current Development Models

Chair: Dr Wenlian Cao, Director, International Cooperation Center (ICC) of the National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC), China

Invited Guest Speakers:

Title: TBD

Dr Shijin Liu, Former Vice President (Vice Minister) and Research Fellow of Development Research Center of the State Council, China


Global Economic Governance Reform Oriented by Economic Transition

Prof Fulin Chi, President, China Institute for Reform and Development (CIRD), Vice Chairman, CIRD's Board of Directors; Vice Chairman, Chinese Research Society for Economic System Reform


The Transformative Force of Culture in Sustainable Development: Innovative Approaches in Practice

Ms Helene George, Founder/Managing Director, Creative Economy Pty Ltd

Discussant: Prof Yongnian Zheng ,Chairman of the Academic Committee, IPP, SCUT; Director, East Asian Institute, National University of Singapore

12:20-13:30      Lunch Break


13:30-15:00 Panel 2: Institutional Perspectives: the Role of Multilateral, Regional

and National Institutions for Sustainable Development

Chair: Ms Mehri Madarshahi, Vice-Chair of the Asia, Pacific Exchange and Cooperation Foundation -Beijing; President, Global Cultural Networks;Member of the International Advisory Board & Visiting Professor of IPP, South China University of Technology


Invited Guest Speakers:

Title: TBD

Dr Wenlian Cao, Director, International Cooperation Center (ICC) of the National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC), China

Deliberative Democracy Experiments in Chinese Local Governments

Prof Kang Chen, director, MPAM and Chinese Executive Education Programme, Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, National University of Singapore


Development and Challenge under China's "New Normal"

Prof Shujie Yao, Director, Nottingham Confucius Institute, University of Nottingham


Discussant: Associate Prof Chenyang Li, Director, Philosophy Programme, School of Humanities and Social Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore


15:00-15:30      Tea Break


15:30-17:00 Panel 3: Education and Sustainable Development

Chair: Prof Fulin Chi, President, China Institute for Reform and Development (CIRD), Vice Chairman, CIRD's Board of Directors; Vice Chairman, Chinese Research Society for Economic System Reform

Invited Guest Speakers:

ESD: Learing by Doing

Mr Abhimanyu Singh, former Director of UNESCO Cluster Office in Beijing


Title: TBD

Mr. Xinsheng Zhang, President, Council of the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN); Former Vice Minister of Chinese Ministry of Education, China

Significance of the Globalization of Education on Building a Global Talent Management Order

Prof Huiyao Wang, President, Center For China & Globalization


Discussant: Prof Shujie Yao, Director, Nottingham Confucius Institute, University of Nottingham


Day 2


9:00-10:00 Keynote Speech: Humanism and Governance: Returning to Confucius

Prof Gungwu Wang, University Professor; Chairman of the Managing Board of the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy; Chairman of the East Asian Institute, National University of Singapore


10:00-10:30  Tea Break


10:30-12:00 Panel 4: Gender Equality, New Humanism and Sustainable Development

Chair: Dr Shijin Liu, Former Vice President (Vice Minister) and Research Fellow of Development Research Center of the State Council, China

Invited Guest Speakers:

China's Informal Labor Market: Opportunities and Challenges

Prof Lina Song, Chair, Economic Sociology and Chinese Studies, School of Contemporary Chinese Studies, University of Nottingham


Incorporating Justice into Decision-making: an Approach to Mainstream Gender Consciousness

Prof Xiajuan Guo, School of Public Affairs, Zhejiang University


Copreneurship and Womens Agency in Small Family Firms under the Transitional Economy of Taiwan

Dr Yu-Hsia Lu, Research Fellow, Institute of Sociology, Academia Sinica, Taiwan

Discussant: Ms Helene George, Founder/Managing Director, Creative Economy Pty Ltd


12:00-13:30      Lunch Break


13:30-15:00 Panel 5: Science, Technology and Innovation for Sustainable

Development and the Impact of New tools of Communication

and Information

Chair: Dr Hans d’Orville , Special Advisor to the Director-General of UNESCO; Honorary Professor& Member of the International Advisory Board, IPP, South China University of Technology


Invited Guest Speakers:


Strategy to Promote National Innovation and Technological Finance

Prof Yuan Wang, Director, China Association for Promotion of Science& Technology and Finance; Former Executive Vice President
of Chinese Academy of Science &Technology for Development


Global Value Chains and new Thinking on Trade and industry Policy

Prof Yuqing Xing, Professor of Economics and the Director of Asian Economic Policy, National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies, Tokyo


China's Bet on Technological Progress as an Engine of Sustainable Growth

Prof Ding Lu, Department of Economics, University of the Fraser Valley, Canada

Discussant: Prof Kang Chen, director, MPAM and Chinese Executive Education Programme, Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, National University of Singapore (TBD)


15:00-15:30    Tea Break


15:30-17:00 Panel 6: Culture and Development Diversity

Chair: Prof Lina Song, Chair, Economic Sociology and Chinese Studies, School of Contemporary Chinese Studies, University of Nottingham

Invited Guest Speakers:

Economics as a Cultural Philosophy and Its Impact on Economy Policy

Prof Yongnian Zheng ,Chairman of the Academic Committee, IPP, SCUT; Director, East Asian Institute, National University of Singapore

Dilemma of Globalization in the 21 Century and China's Transition

Prof Hui Qin, Department of History, School of Humanities, Tsinghua University


New Humanism with Cultural Roots for the Anthropocene--A Confucian Perspective

Associate Prof Chenyang Li, Director, Philosophy Programme, School of Humanities and Social Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore


Discussant: Prof Yuan Wang, Director, China Association for Promotion of Science& Technology and Finance; Former Executive Vice President
of Chinese Academy of Science &Technology for Development

17:00-18:00 Roundtable discussion

New Humanism, Governance and Sustainable Development

Chair: Prof Yongnian Zheng ,Chairman of the Academic Committee, IPP, SCUT; Director, East Asian Institute, National University of Singapore

Discussants:

Prof Fulin Chi

Dr Hans d’Orville

Ms Helene George

Prof Xiajuan Guo (TBD)

Prof Yuqing Xing (TBD)

发表评论

您的电子邮件地址将不会被发表。必填*